Juris Blog

“Conflict” in the Era of the AUMF

By Samantha Cook, Feature Editor When asked to write a post on the topic of a conflict nation, I started to think about the nature of conflict. We typically think of war as an armed conflict between countries’ governments over some geographical, economic, political, or religious dispute. When that dispute […]

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Mexican President-Elect Brings Progressive Views with Trump-esque Flair

By Natalia Holliday, Editor-in-Chief On July 1, 2018, Mexico elected its newest president after an election season pocked by murders of over 100 politicians.[1] Perhaps taking note of the 30,000 murders across the country in 2017 –primarily related to rampant drug cartels[2] – Mexico’s frustrated citizenry chose Andrés Manuel López […]

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Contemporary Colonialism or Crimean Conquistadors? Tensions Flare Between Russia and the United States

By Kyle Steenland, Feature Editor Over the course of its 200-year history, the relationship between the United States and Russia has been symptomatic of their statuses as two world superpowers – riddled with ups and downs, and constantly tense.[1] Even since the de-escalation of Cold War fears, petty political skirmishes […]

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Remembering Linda Brown and Brown v. Board of Education

By Natalia Holliday, Web Editor “[Public school education] is a principal instrument in awakening the child to cultural values, in preparing him for later professional training, and in helping him to adjust normally to his environment…Such an opportunity, where the state has undertaken to provide it, is a right which […]

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